Wedding Traditions ♥ the Veil

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You may not think you’re the kind of girl to wear a veil (like I did) but wait til you try one on with your dress! You feel all that much more princessy!!

The veiling of the bride has origins in the idea that she’s vulnerable to enchantment, so she must be hidden from evil spirits. The Romans veiled brides in flame-colored veils to actually scare off those spirits.

And in an arranged marriage, there is always the threat that the groom, who is perhaps seeing the bride for the first time, won’t like what he sees!

If you’re religious, the veil is a sign of humility and respect before God during your ceremony.

The Victorians turned that reverence into a status symbol. During Victorian times, when archaic customs were formally incorporated into proper weddings, the weight, length and quality of the veil was a sign of the bride’s status. Royal brides had the longest veils and the longest trains (think Princess Di).

Nowadays the tradition is more of a finishing touch in wedding fashion. It’s the icing on the cake, so to speak, that pulls together the hair and the dress.

Just keep in mind if you’re getting married outdoors and it’s windy your veil is likely to be annoyingly flapping in the wind slightly distracting you from your handsome Groom and your marriage ceremony. (Like mine did, I wish I’d have taken a moment to take it off my head like my sensible Bride yesterday stopped and did!)

Safer options to style it up on your big day are a tiara (it doesn’t have to be massive and gaudy) or flowers – fabric, crystal or real.

Or you could simply have a beautiful hairstyle. Whatever you choose, I am sure there will be alcoholic spirits only on your special day!

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